@andrewchen

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Update: I’m joining Andreessen Horowitz!

Hi readers,

Big update: I’m joining Andreessen Horowitz as a general partner!

Starting in April, I’m returning to my roots to invest in and help grow the next generation of startups. I’ll be focused on consumer startups, bottoms up SaaS, marketplaces, and more – utilizing my expertise in growth to launch and scale new companies. Incredibly excited.

How this came together tells you a lot about Marc and Ben, and how Silicon Valley works. I moved to the Bay Area in 2007, as a first time founder with a lot of energy and a lot of questions. I spent the first year meeting everyone I could, reading everything about tech, and writing down all that I was learning. A few months in, I was shocked to get a cold email from Marc introducing himself. Who knew that sort of thing happened? My blog was pretty much anonymous and I could be anyone – but he reached out to talk ideas, which made a big impression. I learned a lot about Silicon Valley that day.

Marc soon introduced me to Ben, and together, they provided a regular stream of advice/ideas/frameworks over breakfasts at the Creamery, Hobee’s, Stacks, and other assorted Palo Alto diners. I was a first-time founder, and the real-life entrepreneurial experiences they relayed – on fundraising, finding product/market fit, hiring, and much more – proved to be insanely helpful. My startup ultimately didn’t work out and the team soft-landed at Uber, but I always remembered the incredible support from Ben and Marc.

Andreessen Horowitz is a firm built on the same core values I saw first-hand. The investing team has a deep empathy for entrepreneurs that reflects their extensive operating experience. The partners on the operating team are incredible and enable the firm’s unmatched support of founders and their companies. For all of these reasons and more, I’m thrilled to join the a16z team.

A decade ago, I learned how impactful it can be when a couple experienced entrepreneurs reach out to a new founder. I can’t wait to close the loop by doing the same – working with new founders and their startups, and helping build the next generation of tech companies.

As excited as I am about the next step, I’m also sad to leave an extraordinary team and experience behind at Uber. I have nothing but admiration for the talented, passionate people who are working hard to ship all the amazing innovations that are coming down the queue. To all my friends and colleagues at Uber, thank you for the amazing two and a half years.

Finally, to the readers of this blog: I’ll be writing much more! The new job will let me put down a lot of what I’ve learned over the past few years. I’m excited to share ideas and stories from across companies and industries with all of you! Looking forward to it.

Onwards!

Andrew
San Francisco, CA

PS. Get new updates/analysis on tech and startups

I write a high-quality, weekly newsletter covering what's happening in Silicon Valley, focused on startups, marketing, and mobile.

Hello 2018! Books, essays, and more from the past year.

Dear readers,

2017 was a big year, where we got Trump’s first(!) year in office, a renaissance in interest around cryptocurrencies, Brexit, Puerto Rico, and oh yeah, things got a little crazy at Uber too. I want to take a moment to share some of my writing from the past year, a few books I’ve read recently, and also include stuff from the last year just for completeness. One of my 2018 goals is to spend more time writing – stay tuned for that – and am looking forward to sharing some incredible learnings I’ve gotten from Uber over the past few years.

As always, thank you again for reading!

Andrew
Hayes Valley, San Francisco, CA

Essays from 2017

Startups are cheaper to build, but more expensive to grow – here’s why
Lots of important trends – cloud computing, open source, etc. – are making it cheaper to start a company. However, growth is getting harder and more expensive because of consolidation, making paid acquisition one of the few channels that still work. Startups are responding by raising more money, monetizing earlier, trying paid channels, and experimenting with referrals instead of virality.

VIDEO: Three things you need to know to raise money in Silicon Valley
I spoke to an audience of French entrepreneurs and tech folks, and explained some of the key lessons from watching startups raise money in San Francisco versus elsewhere. This means focusing on a big story, growth trajectory (versus today’s metrics), respecting differing investor motivations, etc. This is a short video and hope you enjoy it!

How to build a billion-dollar digital marketplace – examples from Uber, eBay, Craigslist, and more
Marketplaces are magical because they both have network effects as well as clear monetization. This means that often when a niche marketplace works, it can grow into adjacent niches quickly. To grow to beyond an initial vertical, startups have to think about expanding geos, adding new products and price points, decrease friction, and grow demand+supply stickiness. I use examples from the major marketplaces to make my points. More to come on this topic!

10 years of professional blogging – what I’ve learned
Expanding on a tweetstorm, this essay breaks down the key lessons I’ve learned from running a professional blog over the last 10 years. This includes how to write content – opinion-driven, please! – and why writing is the best possible networking activity ever.

Books I started reading in 2017

I originally titled this section “Books I read in 2017” but I probably started more books than I actually finished :) Here’s a collection.

Superforecasting
Whenever you read a New York Times political column with a bunch of predictions – Trump is gonna do this! Saudi Arabia is gonna do that! – it’s entertaining, but who’s keeping track of these forecasts? This book covers the academic work of Philip Tetlock from UPenn, who puts together a forecasting competition and tracks who’s good at making these predictions. Lots of interesting learnings and relevant to those making startup investments also! Here’s a NYT article on the foxes versus hedgehog strategies for prediction, btw.

Venture Capitalists at Work: How VCs Identify and Build Billion-Dollar Successes
I read this awhile ago, but picked it up again and read more of the stories. It’s a series of interviews with many of the top venture firms – Floodgate, Founders Fund, First Round, Softbank, CRV – and the companies they’ve invested in. Each interview has a nice discussion and amount of detail. I found this much more compelling than many of the other books I’ve read on VCs, which remain a bit too high-level and adulating.

Reset
Ellen Pao’s story of her time at Kleiner Perkins, Reddit, and more. So much to learn from this experience.

The Ascent of Money
Sapiens for money :) Traces the history of money, the role it’s served over time, and the development of some of the major aspects of our modern financial system. Can’t wait for this to get revised for all the crypto stuff that’s happening now.

The One Device
History of the iPhone. Didn’t read this yet, but I love these recent tech history books.

Principles
Reading this because everyone else is too :) Lots of insights/lessons from Ray Dalio, one of the world’s best hedge fund dudes.

Stories of Your Life and Others
The recent film Arrival was based on this short story.

Area X
The director of my recent favorite movies – Ex Machina – is making a new movie starring Natalie Portman and a bunch of badass ladies exploring a strange, genetic-mutating world secured by the military. Reading the book ahead of time, before I see the movie! Here’s the trailer to the upcoming film.


Featured essays from 2016

10 years in the Bay Area – what I’ve learned
I’ve lived here for the last decade, and have learned a ton of about this region’s entrepreneurial drive, the unique culture, and wonderful folks. I wanted to share a couple lessons learned here.

The Bad Product Fallacy: Don’t confuse “I don’t like it” with “That’s a bad product and it’ll fail”
Your personal use cases and opinion are a shitty predictor of a product’s future success.

Growth is getting hard from intensive competition, consolidation, and saturation
It’s the end of a cycle, and we’re seeing headwinds on paid channels, banner blindless, competitive dynamics, and more. And it’s much harder to compete with boredom than with Facebook/Google/etc.

What 671 million push notifications say about how people spend their day
Here’s a study, based on Leanplum’s data, on how people spend their days – on sports, leisure, phone calls, and otherwise – in addition to what tech platforms they’re using.

Startups and big cos should approach growth differently (Video)
Here’s a video interview breaking down how startups evolve and change their strategies as they gain initial traction, hit product market fit, and eventually start to scale.

What’s next in growth? (Presentation at Australia’s StartCon)
Last year I presented this talk on how marketing has evolved over the last century, and how many of the ideas we think of as “growth” today are actually based on concepts from decades ago. I use this to talk about future platforms and where this might all go.

Uber’s virtuous cycle. Geographic density, hyperlocal marketplaces, and why drivers are key
In my last two years at Uber, I’ve learned a ton about the flywheel that makes Uber’s core business hum and grow incredibly fast. In this essay I draw from Bill Gurley’s essays on network effects, the labor market for part-time workers (aka drivers, “the supply side”), and how surge works within the company. A lot has evolved/changed since I’ve written this, but it’s a good overview from my first year of learnings.

Featured essays from 2015

The Next Feature Fallacy
“The fallacy that the next new feature will suddenly make people use your product.”

New data shows losing 80% of mobile users is normal, and why the best apps do better

This is the Product Death Cycle. Why it happens, and how to break out of it

Personal update- I’m joining Uber! Here’s why
“I’m joining Uber because it’s changing the world. It’s one of the very few companies where you can really say that, seriously and unironically.”

More essays from 2015

This is what free, ad-supported Uber rides might look like. Mockups, economics, and analysis.

The most common mistake when forecasting growth for new products (and how to fix it)

Why we should aim to build a forever company, not just a unicorn

Why investors don’t fund dating

Ten classic books that define tech

The race for Apple Watch’s killer app

Photos of the women who programmed the ENIAC, wrote the code for Apollo 11, and designed the Mac

PS. Get new updates/analysis on tech and startups

I write a high-quality, weekly newsletter covering what's happening in Silicon Valley, focused on startups, marketing, and mobile.

10 years of professional blogging – what I’ve learned

Building your personal bat signal
I want to cross-pollinate a tweetstorm on lessons I’ve learned from a decade of professional writing. In a way, it’s a followup to some more general life lessons from 10 years of living in the Bay Area. Writing has been enormously impactful from a professional standpoint, and I continue to recommend to everyone – especially folks who are new to the Bay Area – to do it as a way to send out the “bat signal” on their aspirations, ideas, and interests.

It’s awesome, but insanely hard to get started. Of course, everyone knows the mechanics of setting up a blog – but the hard part is finding your voice, figuring out topics that are interesting for other folks to read, and building a long-term habit.

The lessons
Without further ado, here are a few opinions I’ve developed up along the way:

  • Titles are 80% of the work, but you write it as the very last thing. It has to be a compelling opinion or important learning
  • There’s always room for high-quality thoughts/opinions. Venn diagram of people w/ knowledge and those we can communicate is tiny
  • Writing is the most scalable professional networking activity – stay home, don’t go to events/conferences, and just put ideas down
  • Think of your writing on the same timescale as your career. Write on a multi-decade timeframe. This means, don’t just pub on Quora/Medium
  • Focus on writing freq over anything else. Schedule it. Don’t worry about building an immediate audience. Focus on the intrinsic.
  • To develop the habit, put a calendar reminder each Sunday for 2 hours. Forced myself to stare at a blank text box and put something down
  • Most of my writing comes from talking/reading deciding I strongly agree or disagree. These opinions become titles. Titles become essays.
  • People are often obsessed with needing to write original ideas. Forget it. You’re a journalist with a day job in the tech industry
  • An email subscriber is worth 100x twitter or LinkedIn followers or whatever other stuff is out there. An email = a real channel
  • I started writing while working at a VC. They asked, “Why give away ideas? That’s your edge.” Ironic that VCs blog/tweet all day now ;)
  • Publishing ideas, learnings, opinions, for years & years is a great way to give. And you’ll figure out how to capture value later

But let’s talk about each one of these in more detail.

The lessons, but with more detail!

Titles are 80% of the work, but you write it as the very last thing. It has to be an compelling opinion or important learning

Titles are often written as a vague pre-thought, but in fact, it’s the most important creative decision you’ll make. Titles are the text that’ll be featured prominently in every tweet, Facebook share, and link – and people will refer to it by name. Titles are best when they can pass the “naked share” test – imagine some text that’s so compelling that even if it’s not linked to anything, people will want to share it.

The best example of this in my work is “Growth Hacker is the new VP Marketing” which started out as a tweet with 20+ shares, and then was developed into an essay afterward. To pass the naked share test, this means a title should be an opinion on its own. Or be a factoid (like push notifs being 40%+ CTR) that’s fascinating and shareable. Or if that’s just too hard, the common “curiosity gap” pattern of a listicle can work too. Just avoid vague titles like “Here are my thoughts on XYZ.” No one cares. As a result, in the course of my work, I often write a placeholder title, write the essay, and then at the very end, spend a good chunk of time iterating on titles until there’s a good one.

There’s always room for high-quality thoughts/opinions. Venn diagram of people w/ knowledge and those we can communicate is tiny

You might think that there are too many blogs on tech, startups, whatever. There’s always room though, when you think of the whitespace as Knowledge x Communication x Medium. People with real knowledge are busy, especially when that knowledge is under a huge amount of demand. And even when an expert can poke their heads up and do something besides executing their craft, they often can’t communicate! It’s hard to make professional content – often dry, boring, technical – into something that’s compelling and accessible to a wide audience. And furthermore, I’d add the medium into the mix as a third dimension, which is the idea that the knowledge can be shared via video, long-form essays, podcasts, presentation decks, etc. Even when there are experts writing long-form content about cryptocurrencies, let’s say, there’s still room in the market for a highly visual version. Just figure out the whitespace and dive in!

Writing is the most scalable professional networking activity – stay home, don’t go to events/conferences, and just put ideas down

When I first moved to the Bay Area, I was spending at least one afternoon/evening a week at a launch party, a conference. Plus hours and hours of 1:1s as I was meeting a ton of people. After an entire year of hard work, I had met something like 1000 new people for one-off conversations. But it took hundreds of hours. At the same time, I was dedicating about the same amount of time to writing, but quickly unlocked 5,000+ people, and started reaching into their inboxes on a weekly basis.

Speaking at conferences is the worst time suck. You spend hours prepping a deck, speak to a group of perhaps a few hundred people, and retain very few them in any meaningful relationship. It can feel good to be recognized, but at the same time, it just can’t compare to writing a piece of content that lives forever. I’m still getting traffic – and email feedback – on essays I wrote ten years ago, which is insane! But that’s the power of scale – nothing can beat content as a bat signal.

Think of your writing on the same timescale as your career. Write on a multi-decade timeframe. This means, don’t just pub on Quora/Medium

Building your network, your audience, and your ideas will be something you’ll want to do over your entire career. Likely a multi-decade thing that will last longer than any individual publishing startup. That’s why I refuse to write on Medium or Quora. Instead, I prefer to run open source software that I can move around, prioritize building my email list (more on that later) and try to keep regular backups. I used to write on Blogger and watched them slowly stop maintaining the platform after the Google acquisition. Then I switched to Typepad, only to watch the same thing happen. I learned my lesson.

Focus on writing freq over anything else. Schedule it. Don’t worry about building an immediate audience. Focus on the intrinsic.

I get it- the activation energy to start publishing your professional ideas and thoughts are high. Nevertheless, because initially no one will read your work, the key is just to get started. Your initial topics and format should be whatever you can do easily and maintain some sort of frequency. Maybe that’s 500 words a month on a new product you’ve tried, and whether you hate or it not. Just get started, find out what you like, and you’ll have a lot of time to figure out the intersection of what you want to write, and what others want to read.

To develop the habit, put a calendar reminder each Sunday for 2 hours. Forced myself to stare at a blank text box and put something down

Several years in, writing remains hard. It’s something that still – to this day – requires time to be set aside. I turn off the music, stop checking email, and write over a few hours to crank something out. Some parts get easier, but the core activity stays difficult. Since starting a normal job (haha) it’s gotten harder to write on Sunday evenings, since that’s when the work email starts. But a good chunk of the writing on this blog happened over Sunday evenings, a few times a month, blocked out with no distractions.

Most of my writing comes from talking/reading deciding I strongly agree or disagree. These opinions become titles. Titles become essays.

After a lively lunch/dinner discussion where a provocative opinion is blurted out – say, that cryptocurrencies are going to be widely adopted and ultimately cause a global recession – I usually write it down. If it’s fun and memorable, it’s an easy thing to write 3-4 supporting points as paragraphs, and turn into an essay later.

People are often obsessed with needing to write original ideas. Forget it. You’re a journalist with a day job in the tech industry

Thinking of yourself as a journalist that’s covering interesting ideas, trends, products, and everything that’s happening around you leads to much better/stronger content. It means you can write often and build on others’ ideas, without feeling like everything has to be completely new. Just as startup ideas are rarely new, but rather twists on older ideas, the same goes for your observations and ideas on tech.

An email subscriber is worth 100x twitter or LinkedIn followers or whatever other stuff is out there. An email = a real channel

For a professional audience, at least, email is the only KPI I care about. Nothing has more engagement. And importantly, to a previous point, it’s independent/decentralized and will clearly be around in a decade – it’s hard to say that about any of these other subscriber metrics. Given that, I focus on my blog’s UI on collecting emails – both on the homepage, at the bottom of essays, plus those annoying popups that are (unfortunately) super effective.

I started writing while working at a VC. They asked, “Why give away ideas? That’s your edge.” Ironic that VCs blog/tweet all day now ;)

It took a long time for VCs to figure out how to market themselves and their ideas :)

Publishing ideas, learnings, opinions, for years & years is a great way to give. And you’ll figure out how to capture value later

The first year of writing, I had an audience of hundreds, including friends/colleagues from Seattle, my sister, etc. It wouldn’t be until a year later that I figured out it was a helpful asset when you’re going out and trying to raise money for a startup! And years after that, to help get your company acquired. And a great launching pad for market research and side projects too!

Creating is the thing – writing is a subset
For me, writing on this blog has been a real gamechanger in terms of building relationships, a professional reputation, etc. But it’s just one potential method of creating and putting content out there. Maybe your version of this is through videos, photography, or podcasts. Or maybe you’re a developer and want to keep shipping open source projects. All of it can work. The important part is just to start giving out your knowledge and ideas – and over time, to build that into a platform for other activities.

Just get started and I doubt you’ll regret it. And to those who’ve been reading my work for the last decade, thank you! I appreciate it.

PS. Bonus lessons
To close, I’ll point you to some bonus ideas from an old essay, How to start a professional blog: 10 tips for new bloggers, written when I was just starting:

  • Carpet bomb a key area and stake out mindshare
  • Take time to find your voice
  • Stay consistent on your blog format and topic
  • Just show up
  • Go deep on your topic of expertise
  • Meatspace and the blogosphere are tightly connected
  • Embrace the universal reader acquisition strategies for blogs
  • Come up with new topics with brainstorms, news headlines, and notes-to-self
  • Look at your analytics every day
  • Don’t overdo it

More details here.

PS. Get new updates/analysis on tech and startups

I write a high-quality, weekly newsletter covering what's happening in Silicon Valley, focused on startups, marketing, and mobile.

How to build a billion dollar digital marketplace – examples from Uber, eBay, Craigslist, and more

VIDEO: Three things you need to know to raise money in Silicon Valley

Startups are cheaper to build, but more expensive to grow – here’s why

This year’s top essays on growth metrics, consumer psychology, Uber, push notifs, NPS, and more

Growth is getting hard from intensive competition, consolidation, and saturation

Psych’d: A new user psychology framework for increasing funnel conversion (Guest Post)

Startups and big cos should approach growth differently (Video)

The Bad Product Fallacy: Don’t confuse “I don’t like it” with “That’s a bad product and it’ll fail”

What’s next in growth?

10 years in the Bay Area – what I’ve learned

How To (Actually) Calculate CAC

Growth Interview Questions from Atlassian, SurveyMonkey, Gusto and Hubspot (Guest Post)

What 671 million push notifications say about how people spend their day

The state of growth hacking (Guest post)

Growth is a system, not a bag of tricks – Manifesto Conference Q&A video/transcript

A Practitioner’s Guide to Net Promoter Score

Quick announcement: The Backstory, a private discussion forum for tech, marketing, growth

Uber’s virtuous cycle. Geographic density, hyperlocal marketplaces, and why drivers are key

My top 2015 essays on Uber, online dating, push notifications, Apple Watch, and more

Personal update- I’m joining Uber! Here’s why

This is the Product Death Cycle. Why it happens, and how to break out of it

Quick update: Quoted in WSJ on dating apps, recent podcast interview, plus recent essays

New data shows losing 80% of mobile users is normal, and why the best apps do better

Photos of the women who programmed the ENIAC, wrote the code for Apollo 11, and designed the Mac

The Next Feature Fallacy: The fallacy that the next new feature will suddenly make people use your product

Why investors don’t fund dating

Why we should aim to build a forever company, not just a unicorn

Ten classic books that define tech

How I first met Eric Ries and also why I’ve ordered his new Kickstarter-exclusive book The Leader’s Guide

This is what free, ad-supported Uber rides might look like. Mockups, economics, and analysis.

Personal update: I’ve moved to Oakland! Here’s why.

The most common mistake when forecasting growth for new products (and how to fix it)

The race for Apple Watch’s killer app

My top essays in 2014 about mobile, growth, and tech

Why messaging apps are so addictive (Guest Post)

IAC’s HowAboutWe co-founder: How to Avoid Delusional Thinking in Start-up Growth Strategy (Guest Post)

Mobile retention benchmarks for 2014 vs 2013 show a 50% drop in D1 retention (Guest post)